Ramen Tatsu-Ya on East Sixth Street now open

[cmg_anvato video=”4357594″ autoplay=”true”]
Ramen Tatsu-Ya has opened its location at 1600 E. Sixth St. The new East Austin shop, the fourth Ramen Tatsu-Ya, is open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. The restaurant serves the same menu as its other locations, along with an expanded craft cocktail menu. 
#1 Original at Ramen Tatsu-Ya (Jay Janner AMERICAN-STATESMAN)

Update: Loro closed Tuesday following smoke-related evacuation

[cmg_anvato video=”4357594″ autoplay=”true”]

Update: Loro will be closed all day Tuesday following the smoke incident Monday night.

Some team members at Loro smelled smoke Monday night, leading to an evacuation and a visit from the Austin Fire and Police departments. While nobody was hurt, the incident, which Loro says made the restaurant get a little smokier than usual, has led the Asian smokehouse to close for lunch Tuesday. Management has not yet decided whether the restaurant on South Lamar will be open for dinner, but keep an eye on their Facebook and Instagram for updates.

Frozen mango sake cocktail at Loro. (Arianna Auber AMERICAN-STATESMAN)

Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille opening North Austin location

Houston-based Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille is opening a location at Domain Northside. The location, the second Perry’s in Austin, will be at 11801 Domain Blvd. and is slated to open in early 2019.

Tableside Chateaubriand at Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille. (Ricardo B. Brazziell AMERICAN-STATESMAN)

The first Austin outpost of the steakhouse opened at Seventh and Colorado streets in October 2008.

Pacific Asian restaurant and cocktail bar coming to downtown’s 2nd Street District

The 2nd Street District will be getting an infusion of Asian flavors later this summer, as She’s Not Here is set to open in the former Malaga space at 440 Second St. next to the Violet Crown Cinema. The restaurant, operated by Uchi veterans Ben Cachila (former Uchi development director) and Chris Romero (branding and marketing director), will serve lunch and dinner and a Pacific Asian-influenced cocktail list. The chefs for the concept have not been announced.

Soft shell crab from She’s Not Here. (Credit: Nicolai McCrary)

The lunch menu will center on quickie dishes like grab-and-go bento boxes with pork belly rolls and fried chicken sandwiches, while the dinner menu will include dishes like Hawaiian Saimin noodles in a Shanghai beef tip and Tokyo clam broth, Filipino porchetta stuffed with sugarcane-grilled shrimp, and Tasmanian ocean trout with passion fruit.

Cocktails will feature Pacific Asian-influences flavor profiles from the use of hibiscus rye, roasted coconut, jasmine, cloves, falooda syrup, cardamom, kaffir lime and more.

She’s Not Here is planning to be open Sunday-Thursday from 11 a.m. to midnight and Friday and Saturday until 2 a.m. Follow progress on social media channels like Facebook and Instagram and visit shnaustin.com for more details.

Downtown sandwich spot closes unexpectedly

Capitol denizens and downtown workers along the northern strip of Congress Avenue are going to have to find a new option for their lunchtime sandwich fix.

Credit: Planet Sub Facebook

Planet Sub (906 Congress Ave.) has closed, posting a sign on the door indicating that the closure came due to the shop’s inability to adequately staff. The sign also states that the Cedar Park location (1320 Cedar Creek Blvd.) of the regional chain popular from Texas to Michigan remains open.

One of Austin’s oldest restaurants is closing

[cmg_anvato video=”4357594″ autoplay=”true”]

Austin will lose a piece of its dining history later this month when the Frisco closes July 29. The shutter, first confirmed by the Austin Business Journal, will be the end of the 65-year run for a restaurant that was originally opened by Harry Akin at Koenig Lane and Burnet Road in 1953. 

The Frisco on Burnet Road. (AMERICAN-STATESMAN)

Known for its comfort food like beef tips, chicken-fried steak, chicken and dumplings and icebox pie, the Frisco Shop was part of the Night Hawk chain that Akin, mayor of Austin from 1967 to 1969, started in 1932 when he opened the first Night Hawk at Riverside Drive and Congress Avenue. The Frisco Shop, which moved into the former Curra’s Grill location at 6801 Burnet Road when the original was demolished to make way for a Walgreen’s, was the last of that storied chain. 

In addition to being a staple for decades for families and devoted regulars, the Frisco Shop and Night Hawk also played important roles in the sociopolitical history of Austin, as Akin was one of the first white restaurateurs to serve black customers. 

PHOTOS: 20 Austin restaurants that are at least 20 years old

“He was a hero to me,” former Texas Comptroller Carole Keeton Strayhorn told the Statesman in 2008 when the new Frisco Shop location opened. “Harry was open and accessible to all, which is what Austin is all about. He was a visionary and with the times.”

Go to mystatesman.com to read more about the Frisco and the fans who are coming by for one last meal.

RELATED

From 2017: El Gallo closing in South Austin after 60 years in business
From 2016: One of Austin’s oldest Mexican restaurants closes

One of the Top 20 restaurants in Austin is closing

[cmg_anvato video=”4357594″ autoplay=”true”]

Downtown is losing one of Austin’s rare fine dining establishments. Counter 357, the prix fixe menu specialists on Congress Avenue, announced on social media that it would close July 28.

The Peeler Ranch Striploin with local potato, summer truffle and beeswax at Counter 3. FIVE. VII on Thursday, May 11, 2017. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Chef Eric Earthman oepened the austere and modernist space in March 2015 and cycled through three chefs — Lawrence Kocurek, Damien Brockway and Alan Delgado — before announcing the restaurant would shutter after just over three years.

The announcement comes on the heels of closures from fellow Top 25 restaurants Bonhomie and Bullfight and is a blow to locally owned businesses in a downtown that is seeing increased rents and more national brands entering the market. There is no word on what will come of the space nestled in between the Elephant Room and Swift’s Attic.

RELATED

Review from 2015: Attention to details sets Counter 357 apart